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Restrictions Ease For More Victorian Businesses

Density quotients of one person per two square metres will soon be lifted for small-to-medium sized venues across the state – but Victorians need to keep playing their part to help us stay safe and stay open by checking in using the Victorian Government QR Code Service through the Service Victoria app. From 28 May, these venues can have up to 200 people per space (such as a dining room or band room) without any density limit, provided COVID marshals are on site ensuring all patrons are checking in to each space. These changes will apply for spaces that are 400 sqm or below, larger spaces still need to observe density limits. This means Victoria’s live music venues, restaurants, bars and nightclubs, will be able to welcome more patrons in a COVIDSafe way. It’s also an important step for places of worship, with people able to register their details and gather in greater numbers within spaces smaller than 400 square metres. From 28 May, all venues and businesses required to undertake electronic record keeping must use the Victorian Government QR Code Service through the Service Victoria app. This is convenient for Victorians and gives contact tracers access to the best data quickly. While many Victorians are doing the right thing, public health officials remain concerned about low rates of check-ins. All Victorians are encouraged to download the Service Victoria app to make checking in as fast and easy as possible. A recent survey showed only 41 per cent of visitors to hospitality venues checked in every time, while 24 per cent of sites visited by Authorised Officers between 30 April and 2 May were warned or received notices due to lack of compliance with electronic record keeping. The public health advice is clear: in order to ease density quotients at venues, compliance with electronic record keeping among businesses and Victorians has to increase. Moving to a single QR code service through the Service Victoria app will increase compliance and allow restrictions to continue to ease in line with public health advice. The Victorian Government will communicate with third party providers who engaged with the Visitation API process and ensuring continued strong management of any check-in data held during this three-week transition and implementation period. Density quotients will also be removed for outdoor non-seated venues such as recreation facilities, community sport, pools, tourism services and non-seated outdoor entertainment (e.g. zoos). Existing COVIDSafe requirements will still apply, supported by use of the Victorian Government QR Code Service.

Restrictions Ease For More Victorian Businesses

Density quotients of one person per two square metres will soon be lifted for small-to-medium sized venues across the state – but Victorians need to keep playing their part to help us stay safe and stay open by checking in using the Victorian Government QR Code Service through the Service Victoria app. From 28 May, these venues can have up to 200 people per space (such as a dining room or band room) without any density limit, provided COVID marshals are on site ensuring all patrons are checking in to each space. These changes will apply for spaces that are 400 sqm or below, larger spaces still need to observe density limits. This means Victoria’s live music venues, restaurants, bars and nightclubs, will be able to welcome more patrons in a COVIDSafe way. It’s also an important step for places of worship, with people able to register their details and gather in greater numbers within spaces smaller than 400 square metres. From 28 May, all venues and businesses required to undertake electronic record keeping must use the Victorian Government QR Code Service through the Service Victoria app. This is convenient for Victorians and gives contact tracers access to the best data quickly. While many Victorians are doing the right thing, public health officials remain concerned about low rates of check-ins. All Victorians are encouraged to download the Service Victoria app to make checking in as fast and easy as possible. A recent survey showed only 41 per cent of visitors to hospitality venues checked in every time, while 24 per cent of sites visited by Authorised Officers between 30 April and 2 May were warned or received notices due to lack of compliance with electronic record keeping. The public health advice is clear: in order to ease density quotients at venues, compliance with electronic record keeping among businesses and Victorians has to increase. Moving to a single QR code service through the Service Victoria app will increase compliance and allow restrictions to continue to ease in line with public health advice. The Victorian Government will communicate with third party providers who engaged with the Visitation API process and ensuring continued strong management of any check-in data held during this three-week transition and implementation period. Density quotients will also be removed for outdoor non-seated venues such as recreation facilities, community sport, pools, tourism services and non-seated outdoor entertainment (e.g. zoos). Existing COVIDSafe requirements will still apply, supported by use of the Victorian Government QR Code Service.

More Ambulances, More Paramedics And More Beds

As we continue to recover from the global coronavirus pandemic, the Andrews Labor Government is putting more paramedics and ambulances on the road and ensuring health services are equipped to meet the unprecedented levels of demand we’re seeing across the country.  The Victorian Budget 2021/22 will deliver more than $759 million in funding for more paramedics, more triage care and support staff for Ambulance Victoria, as well as targeted funding to improve flow in our busy emergency departments. The investment will also support the opening of new beds in health services across the state, supported by Victoria’s hardworking healthcare workforce. Despite Victoria being free of community transmission, the global coronavirus pandemic has had a lasting impact on our entire health system – as is reflected in states and territories across Australia. Last year, while the necessary restrictions were in place to save lives, many people deferred their normal check-ups and care routines, which means there is now a large number of Victorians presenting to our hospitals with more complex or critical conditions. People with coronavirus symptoms may also not able to attend their GPs, as many require a negative test in order to make an appointment. For some, particularly worried families with unwell children, this means they are then presenting straight to our emergency departments. This is becoming more of a concern, particularly as flu season begins. The coronavirus pandemic also changed the way Victorians access routine care – last quarter alone, there were more than 36,000 callers to 000 who did not need an emergency ambulance and were instead connected to more appropriate primary care services. Between July-September 2020 and January-March 2021, the volume of emergency department presentations increased by 30 per cent, putting additional strain on all parts of our health system and our healthcare workforce.   Workforce fatigue from the global pandemic, cases being more complex and critical, staff having to don PPE and take extra COVIDSafe precautions with patients, and more people presenting to emergency departments also means Victoria’s usual health performance measures have been impacted and may take some time to recover. To speed up this recovery and address changing demand, the Labor Government will invest an extra $266 million in Ambulance Victoria to support them with things like additional triage nurses, an expansion to secondary triage services and non-emergency patient transfers. It will also help deliver new paramedics and additional support staff to help their hardworking colleagues – and reach Victorians when they’re needed most.  Another $204.3 million investment will bolster Ambulance Victoria’s resources through programs like Telehealth, and will deliver ongoing operational improvements across the state. This will build on the more than 250 paramedics already recruited by Ambulance Victoria since November 2020 and the more than $1 billion in funding for Ambulance Victoria since Labor came to Government.   The support also builds on the work we’re doing to ensure our healthcare workers who worked tirelessly to protect Victorians throughout the pandemic, have access to the mental health and wellbeing services they need with our $9.8 million Worker Wellbeing Centre, delivered through last year’s Budget.     With our Ambulances Services and hospitals so interlinked, it’s important additional demand and patient care complexities are addressed as a whole. The Labor Government will invest a further $89 million to boost capacity and drive improvements and support flow through our busy emergency departments. Another $200 million will commission the opening of hospital facilities – including supporting the operation of previously announced beds as they open and any additional staffing required – whether they be our hardworking nurses, allied health professionals or doctors. The Government will also continue working closely with experts from our health services, ambulances services, workforce representatives and primary health services to determine where the need is most and how we can best address it, to ensure Victorians get the care they need.

More Ambulances, More Paramedics And More Beds

As we continue to recover from the global coronavirus pandemic, the Andrews Labor Government is putting more paramedics and ambulances on the road and ensuring health services are equipped to meet the unprecedented levels of demand we’re seeing across the country.  The Victorian Budget 2021/22 will deliver more than $759 million in funding for more paramedics, more triage care and support staff for Ambulance Victoria, as well as targeted funding to improve flow in our busy emergency departments. The investment will also support the opening of new beds in health services across the state, supported by Victoria’s hardworking healthcare workforce. Despite Victoria being free of community transmission, the global coronavirus pandemic has had a lasting impact on our entire health system – as is reflected in states and territories across Australia. Last year, while the necessary restrictions were in place to save lives, many people deferred their normal check-ups and care routines, which means there is now a large number of Victorians presenting to our hospitals with more complex or critical conditions. People with coronavirus symptoms may also not able to attend their GPs, as many require a negative test in order to make an appointment. For some, particularly worried families with unwell children, this means they are then presenting straight to our emergency departments. This is becoming more of a concern, particularly as flu season begins. The coronavirus pandemic also changed the way Victorians access routine care – last quarter alone, there were more than 36,000 callers to 000 who did not need an emergency ambulance and were instead connected to more appropriate primary care services. Between July-September 2020 and January-March 2021, the volume of emergency department presentations increased by 30 per cent, putting additional strain on all parts of our health system and our healthcare workforce.   Workforce fatigue from the global pandemic, cases being more complex and critical, staff having to don PPE and take extra COVIDSafe precautions with patients, and more people presenting to emergency departments also means Victoria’s usual health performance measures have been impacted and may take some time to recover. To speed up this recovery and address changing demand, the Labor Government will invest an extra $266 million in Ambulance Victoria to support them with things like additional triage nurses, an expansion to secondary triage services and non-emergency patient transfers. It will also help deliver new paramedics and additional support staff to help their hardworking colleagues – and reach Victorians when they’re needed most.  Another $204.3 million investment will bolster Ambulance Victoria’s resources through programs like Telehealth, and will deliver ongoing operational improvements across the state. This will build on the more than 250 paramedics already recruited by Ambulance Victoria since November 2020 and the more than $1 billion in funding for Ambulance Victoria since Labor came to Government.   The support also builds on the work we’re doing to ensure our healthcare workers who worked tirelessly to protect Victorians throughout the pandemic, have access to the mental health and wellbeing services they need with our $9.8 million Worker Wellbeing Centre, delivered through last year’s Budget.     With our Ambulances Services and hospitals so interlinked, it’s important additional demand and patient care complexities are addressed as a whole. The Labor Government will invest a further $89 million to boost capacity and drive improvements and support flow through our busy emergency departments. Another $200 million will commission the opening of hospital facilities – including supporting the operation of previously announced beds as they open and any additional staffing required – whether they be our hardworking nurses, allied health professionals or doctors. The Government will also continue working closely with experts from our health services, ambulances services, workforce representatives and primary health services to determine where the need is most and how we can best address it, to ensure Victorians get the care they need.

New Laws To Make Schools Safer For Everyone

The Andrews Labor Government is giving Victorian schools the power to ban aggressive and violent parents from entering school grounds, to protect students and staff. Minister for Education James Merlino today introduced the Education and Training Reform Amendment (Protection of School Communities) Bill 2021, delivering on a key recommendation from the 2018 Protective Schools Ministerial Taskforce. The Bill will help empower authorised persons, such as school principals, to issue School Community Safety Orders to parents, carers and other people who engage in harmful, threatening or abusive behaviour. The new laws will also allow schools to ban parents that engage in threatening or abusive communication through social media and other channels. Schools will be able to impose requirements on the way parents, carers or other adult members of the school community interact with the school or school community – including stopping them from entering school grounds or other locations where school events are occurring, if reasonably necessary. Schools must ensure people issued with the new Orders are still able to communicate with the school and be informed about the child's education, and make arrangements to ensure the child's attendance at the school and school activities. The changes build on existing legislation and will provide greater procedural fairness to parents, carers and other adult members of the school community. This includes internal merits review, and external review at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal if the person doesn’t agree with the outcome. If a person fails to comply with a School Community Safety Order, an application can be made to the Magistrates' Court for an order requiring compliance, a civil penalty of up to 60 penalty units, or any other order that the Court considers appropriate. The Bill is part of a broader strategy targeting the small minority of parents, carers and other members of school communities who engage in such inappropriate behaviour. It will also include an ongoing school-based communications campaign to address parent and carer aggression, The Government has undertaken targeted consultation with stakeholders including teacher unions, school associations, parent associations, Victoria Legal Aid, Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service, Foundation House, Victorian Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, and the Victorian Multicultural Commission. Quotes attributable to Minister for Education James Merlino “No one should be threatened or intimidated at work or at school – that’s why we’re introducing these new laws to protect staff, students and their families.”    “These vital new measures will empower our senior school leaders to take necessary actions when inappropriate behaviour is being levelled towards people in the school community”. 

New Laws To Make Schools Safer For Everyone

The Andrews Labor Government is giving Victorian schools the power to ban aggressive and violent parents from entering school grounds, to protect students and staff. Minister for Education James Merlino today introduced the Education and Training Reform Amendment (Protection of School Communities) Bill 2021, delivering on a key recommendation from the 2018 Protective Schools Ministerial Taskforce. The Bill will help empower authorised persons, such as school principals, to issue School Community Safety Orders to parents, carers and other people who engage in harmful, threatening or abusive behaviour. The new laws will also allow schools to ban parents that engage in threatening or abusive communication through social media and other channels. Schools will be able to impose requirements on the way parents, carers or other adult members of the school community interact with the school or school community – including stopping them from entering school grounds or other locations where school events are occurring, if reasonably necessary. Schools must ensure people issued with the new Orders are still able to communicate with the school and be informed about the child's education, and make arrangements to ensure the child's attendance at the school and school activities. The changes build on existing legislation and will provide greater procedural fairness to parents, carers and other adult members of the school community. This includes internal merits review, and external review at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal if the person doesn’t agree with the outcome. If a person fails to comply with a School Community Safety Order, an application can be made to the Magistrates' Court for an order requiring compliance, a civil penalty of up to 60 penalty units, or any other order that the Court considers appropriate. The Bill is part of a broader strategy targeting the small minority of parents, carers and other members of school communities who engage in such inappropriate behaviour. It will also include an ongoing school-based communications campaign to address parent and carer aggression, The Government has undertaken targeted consultation with stakeholders including teacher unions, school associations, parent associations, Victoria Legal Aid, Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service, Foundation House, Victorian Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, and the Victorian Multicultural Commission. Quotes attributable to Minister for Education James Merlino “No one should be threatened or intimidated at work or at school – that’s why we’re introducing these new laws to protect staff, students and their families.”    “These vital new measures will empower our senior school leaders to take necessary actions when inappropriate behaviour is being levelled towards people in the school community”. 

Delivering Even More Police To Keep The Community Safe

The Andrews Labor Government’s record investment in Victoria Police will see an additional 396 frontline officers deployed to where they are needed most across the state over the next 12 months. Acting Minister for Police and Emergency Services Danny Pearson joined Chief Commissioner Shane Patton today to announce the allocation as part of the Government’s ongoing work to protect communities. From May 2021 to April 2022, 229 police officers will be deployed to stations across Victoria, while a further 167 will be dedicated to specialist roles such as family violence, road policing and state emergency support. Recruits are currently progressing through rigorous training at the Police Academy, undertaking practical exercises and assessments with a strong focus on some of the biggest issues currently facing police – such as public order response at major events and protests, family violence and mental health. This latest deployment completes the delivery of 3,135 new police officers since the massive recruitment boost kicked off in 2016, and will allow police to focus on supporting growing communities – ensuring they have the resources they need to efficiently respond to crime in their local area. Frontline police are deployed across the state using the Staff Allocation Model (SAM), which was developed by Victoria Police in consultation with the Police Association of Victoria to match police with demand and population growth, and deliver the resources needed for high visibility and proactive policing. SAM has been critical in assessing the impact of the 2019-20 bushfires and COVID-19 on police resourcing. It will also guide the changing operational environment in the CBD as people return to work and events recommence. Since 2016, Community Safety Statements have set out the joint commitment between the Government and Victoria Police to deliver on the policy and community safety agenda for Victoria. The 2017 statement featured the biggest investment in community safety in our state’s history, with funding for recruiting  and deploying a record number of police, rolling out new technology like bodyworn cameras and smart devices, development and implementation of the Police Assistance Line and new aerial capability . The Community Safety Trustee, Mr Ron Iddles OAM APM, was appointed in 2017 to report on the implementation of Community Safety Statement reforms and provide expert advice on community safety and the delivery of key parts of the Government’s reforms and record investment. The Trustee has today published his final report commending the efforts of both Victoria Police and the Department of Justice and Community Safety progressing the implementation of the Government’s record investment in Community Safety Statement initiatives since 2017.

Delivering Even More Police To Keep The Community Safe

The Andrews Labor Government’s record investment in Victoria Police will see an additional 396 frontline officers deployed to where they are needed most across the state over the next 12 months. Acting Minister for Police and Emergency Services Danny Pearson joined Chief Commissioner Shane Patton today to announce the allocation as part of the Government’s ongoing work to protect communities. From May 2021 to April 2022, 229 police officers will be deployed to stations across Victoria, while a further 167 will be dedicated to specialist roles such as family violence, road policing and state emergency support. Recruits are currently progressing through rigorous training at the Police Academy, undertaking practical exercises and assessments with a strong focus on some of the biggest issues currently facing police – such as public order response at major events and protests, family violence and mental health. This latest deployment completes the delivery of 3,135 new police officers since the massive recruitment boost kicked off in 2016, and will allow police to focus on supporting growing communities – ensuring they have the resources they need to efficiently respond to crime in their local area. Frontline police are deployed across the state using the Staff Allocation Model (SAM), which was developed by Victoria Police in consultation with the Police Association of Victoria to match police with demand and population growth, and deliver the resources needed for high visibility and proactive policing. SAM has been critical in assessing the impact of the 2019-20 bushfires and COVID-19 on police resourcing. It will also guide the changing operational environment in the CBD as people return to work and events recommence. Since 2016, Community Safety Statements have set out the joint commitment between the Government and Victoria Police to deliver on the policy and community safety agenda for Victoria. The 2017 statement featured the biggest investment in community safety in our state’s history, with funding for recruiting  and deploying a record number of police, rolling out new technology like bodyworn cameras and smart devices, development and implementation of the Police Assistance Line and new aerial capability . The Community Safety Trustee, Mr Ron Iddles OAM APM, was appointed in 2017 to report on the implementation of Community Safety Statement reforms and provide expert advice on community safety and the delivery of key parts of the Government’s reforms and record investment. The Trustee has today published his final report commending the efforts of both Victoria Police and the Department of Justice and Community Safety progressing the implementation of the Government’s record investment in Community Safety Statement initiatives since 2017.

 

GRANT DELIVERS BREATH OF FRESH AIR TO SUBURBAN PARK

Suburban parks and reserves across Melbourne will be given new life as part of the Victorian Government’s $10 million Parks Revitalisation Grants Program. Forty-one suburban parks will receive revitalisation grants to fund a range of upgrades, including new seating, barbecues, toilets, fencing, landscaping, lighting, shading, path upgrades, as well as demolition of old assets, and installation of park infrastructure, water features and playgrounds. Residents of Brimbank City Council will soon benefit from increased recreation and social opportunities, improved safety, and better land use in Keilor North and Keilor Park. Brimbank City Council has been granted $300,000.00 in funding to support improvements of Sydenham Park at Keilor North and $300,000.00 for Keilor Park Recreation Reserve, giving locals more reason to get outdoors. The Parks Revitalisation Grants for 41 parks and reserves across Melbourne are part of the $154 million Suburban Parks Program, which is also investing $35 million for 29 new pocket parks and $5 million for up to 16 new off-leash dog parks. This bold program to deliver quality open space to Melburnians will also create jobs in industries such as construction, design and landscaping as Victoria rebuilds from the economic impacts of coronavirus. The Victorian Government will work in partnership with Brimbank City Council to deliver this project. The 41 park upgrades are anticipated to be completed in 2022. For more information about the Suburban Parks Program, including a list of grant recipients, visit: environment.vic.gov.au/suburban-parks Quotes attributable to Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio “Melbourne’s open spaces are at the heart of our city and provide social, economic, environmental and health and wellbeing benefits to our communities. We are investing in projects to improve our open space network now, to ensure we meet the needs of the community in the future.” “By partnering with councils to deliver improvements to existing parks, we are investing in projects that will meet the unique needs of local communities. This will promote visitation by existing users and welcome a variety of different park users.” Quotes attributable to Natalie Hutchins MP, State Member for Sydenham “This funding will greatly benefit the community of Brimbank by encouraging us to make the most of Keilor Park Recreation Reserve and Sydenham Park.

GRANT DELIVERS BREATH OF FRESH AIR TO SUBURBAN PARK

Suburban parks and reserves across Melbourne will be given new life as part of the Victorian Government’s $10 million Parks Revitalisation Grants Program. Forty-one suburban parks will receive revitalisation grants to fund a range of upgrades, including new seating, barbecues, toilets, fencing, landscaping, lighting, shading, path upgrades, as well as demolition of old assets, and installation of park infrastructure, water features and playgrounds. Residents of Brimbank City Council will soon benefit from increased recreation and social opportunities, improved safety, and better land use in Keilor North and Keilor Park. Brimbank City Council has been granted $300,000.00 in funding to support improvements of Sydenham Park at Keilor North and $300,000.00 for Keilor Park Recreation Reserve, giving locals more reason to get outdoors. The Parks Revitalisation Grants for 41 parks and reserves across Melbourne are part of the $154 million Suburban Parks Program, which is also investing $35 million for 29 new pocket parks and $5 million for up to 16 new off-leash dog parks. This bold program to deliver quality open space to Melburnians will also create jobs in industries such as construction, design and landscaping as Victoria rebuilds from the economic impacts of coronavirus. The Victorian Government will work in partnership with Brimbank City Council to deliver this project. The 41 park upgrades are anticipated to be completed in 2022. For more information about the Suburban Parks Program, including a list of grant recipients, visit: environment.vic.gov.au/suburban-parks Quotes attributable to Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio “Melbourne’s open spaces are at the heart of our city and provide social, economic, environmental and health and wellbeing benefits to our communities. We are investing in projects to improve our open space network now, to ensure we meet the needs of the community in the future.” “By partnering with councils to deliver improvements to existing parks, we are investing in projects that will meet the unique needs of local communities. This will promote visitation by existing users and welcome a variety of different park users.” Quotes attributable to Natalie Hutchins MP, State Member for Sydenham “This funding will greatly benefit the community of Brimbank by encouraging us to make the most of Keilor Park Recreation Reserve and Sydenham Park.

Viral fragments detected in wastewater samples in Western suburbs

Viral fragments have been recently detected in wastewater samples taken from sewer catchments in the eastern, western, north-western and outer northern suburbs. Given the current prolonged period of no community transmission in Victoria, it is most likely that this is due to a person or persons continuing to shed the virus after the infection period however, it could also be due to a person living in or travelling through the area in the early active infectious phase. The wastewater testing program is designed as an early warning system to support our ongoing efforts in continuing to protect the COVIDSafe environment we have achieved and therefore a cautious approach is always taken when these detections are found. People who live in or have visited these areas who have or develop COVID symptoms are strongly encouraged to get tested and help keep Victoria communities COVID free. Western suburbs catchment 18-26 April 2021 Persons visiting or residing in Albanvale, Burnside, Burnside Heights, Cairnlea, Caroline Springs, Deer Park, Delahey, Hillside (Melton), Keilor Downs, Kings Park, Plumpton, Ravenhall, Sydenham, Taylors Hill or Taylors Lakes. North-western suburbs catchment 18-26 April 2021 Persons visiting or residing in Avondale Heights, Calder Park, Hillside (Melton), Kealba, Keilor, Keilor Downs, Keilor East, Keilor Lodge, Keilor North, Keilor Park, Sydenham or Taylors Lakes. Further information about the wastewater testing program can be found here: https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/wastewater-testing-covid-19 Find your nearest COVID-19 testing site: https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/covid-19-testing-sites

Viral fragments detected in wastewater samples in Western suburbs

Viral fragments have been recently detected in wastewater samples taken from sewer catchments in the eastern, western, north-western and outer northern suburbs. Given the current prolonged period of no community transmission in Victoria, it is most likely that this is due to a person or persons continuing to shed the virus after the infection period however, it could also be due to a person living in or travelling through the area in the early active infectious phase. The wastewater testing program is designed as an early warning system to support our ongoing efforts in continuing to protect the COVIDSafe environment we have achieved and therefore a cautious approach is always taken when these detections are found. People who live in or have visited these areas who have or develop COVID symptoms are strongly encouraged to get tested and help keep Victoria communities COVID free. Western suburbs catchment 18-26 April 2021 Persons visiting or residing in Albanvale, Burnside, Burnside Heights, Cairnlea, Caroline Springs, Deer Park, Delahey, Hillside (Melton), Keilor Downs, Kings Park, Plumpton, Ravenhall, Sydenham, Taylors Hill or Taylors Lakes. North-western suburbs catchment 18-26 April 2021 Persons visiting or residing in Avondale Heights, Calder Park, Hillside (Melton), Kealba, Keilor, Keilor Downs, Keilor East, Keilor Lodge, Keilor North, Keilor Park, Sydenham or Taylors Lakes. Further information about the wastewater testing program can be found here: https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/wastewater-testing-covid-19 Find your nearest COVID-19 testing site: https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/covid-19-testing-sites

SUPPORTING KOORIE KIDS TO SUCCEED

Koorie kids, families and organisations will lead our efforts to better support Koorie students, under a new co-design initiative announced by the Andrews Labor Government. With funding of almost $3.7 million, we’re starting a state-wide consultation and co-design process that will deliver community-led changes in our schools, ensuring Aboriginal voices are at the heart of reform. Reflecting the Labor Government’s commitment to self-determination, this investment will support community organisations to build capability and preparedness to partner with our schools and see 45 Koorie Education Roundtables held across the state, ensuring Aboriginal Victorians have a voice on what’s working and what’s not working for Koorie students in our schools. The funding will also resource Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations (ACCOs) and Traditional Owner Groups to host community-led conversations on furthering self-determination in our schools and across our education system. These findings will then be used to help our schools better support Koorie students. Reforms could include schools formally partnering with Koorie communities and organisations, including ACCOs, to overcome barriers to student engagement and learning, in addition to greater inclusion of Koorie culture in our classrooms. Koorie students perform well in NAPLAN across most learning areas and year levels compared to Aboriginal students in other jurisdictions. For example, since 2015, the proportion of Koorie students achieving in the top two NAPLAN bands has improved in reading Year 3 and Year 5,and in numeracy in Year 3. However, within Victoria, mean NAPLAN scores for Koorie students are substantially below those of their non-indigenous peers. At the same time, consistent community feedback has highlighted the need for schools to change approaches and processes that are at risk of 'mainstreaming' or sidelining Koorie students. That’s why this initiative will use the knowledge and capacity of local Koorie communities to develop best-practice models of support that meet the needs of students, while ensuring the community is a genuine partner in improving outcomes for Koorie kids. This will build on successful existing Labor Government programs that support Koorie students, including the Koorie Literacy and Numeracy program, the Koorie Pre-School Assistants program, the Koorie Families as First Educators program, the Koorie Engagement Support Officer program, and the Marrung: Aboriginal Education Plan 2016-2026.

SUPPORTING KOORIE KIDS TO SUCCEED

Koorie kids, families and organisations will lead our efforts to better support Koorie students, under a new co-design initiative announced by the Andrews Labor Government. With funding of almost $3.7 million, we’re starting a state-wide consultation and co-design process that will deliver community-led changes in our schools, ensuring Aboriginal voices are at the heart of reform. Reflecting the Labor Government’s commitment to self-determination, this investment will support community organisations to build capability and preparedness to partner with our schools and see 45 Koorie Education Roundtables held across the state, ensuring Aboriginal Victorians have a voice on what’s working and what’s not working for Koorie students in our schools. The funding will also resource Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations (ACCOs) and Traditional Owner Groups to host community-led conversations on furthering self-determination in our schools and across our education system. These findings will then be used to help our schools better support Koorie students. Reforms could include schools formally partnering with Koorie communities and organisations, including ACCOs, to overcome barriers to student engagement and learning, in addition to greater inclusion of Koorie culture in our classrooms. Koorie students perform well in NAPLAN across most learning areas and year levels compared to Aboriginal students in other jurisdictions. For example, since 2015, the proportion of Koorie students achieving in the top two NAPLAN bands has improved in reading Year 3 and Year 5,and in numeracy in Year 3. However, within Victoria, mean NAPLAN scores for Koorie students are substantially below those of their non-indigenous peers. At the same time, consistent community feedback has highlighted the need for schools to change approaches and processes that are at risk of 'mainstreaming' or sidelining Koorie students. That’s why this initiative will use the knowledge and capacity of local Koorie communities to develop best-practice models of support that meet the needs of students, while ensuring the community is a genuine partner in improving outcomes for Koorie kids. This will build on successful existing Labor Government programs that support Koorie students, including the Koorie Literacy and Numeracy program, the Koorie Pre-School Assistants program, the Koorie Families as First Educators program, the Koorie Engagement Support Officer program, and the Marrung: Aboriginal Education Plan 2016-2026.

Save the “Old Sydenham” Station

Sydenham is on the cusp of losing one of its last historical buildings – the 1912, ‘Old Sydenham Station’ with a recent planning permit submitted to Brimbank City Council, requesting relocation by the The Mornington Railway Preservation Society.   Show your support to oppose the proposed move by signing this petition and help save this local historical landmark.   Change.org/SaveSydenham   https://brimbanknorthwest.starweekly.com.au/news/mp-leads-call-to-keep-old-station/?fbclid=IwAR1HfFfO8KrCkOrJzj7OTkW5oapAheHv0j81L-dJJJU9629Gzn2XHhDrCKc

Save the “Old Sydenham” Station

Sydenham is on the cusp of losing one of its last historical buildings – the 1912, ‘Old Sydenham Station’ with a recent planning permit submitted to Brimbank City Council, requesting relocation by the The Mornington Railway Preservation Society.   Show your support to oppose the proposed move by signing this petition and help save this local historical landmark.   Change.org/SaveSydenham   https://brimbanknorthwest.starweekly.com.au/news/mp-leads-call-to-keep-old-station/?fbclid=IwAR1HfFfO8KrCkOrJzj7OTkW5oapAheHv0j81L-dJJJU9629Gzn2XHhDrCKc