Media Centre

Tutor Target Exceeded Across Victorian Schools

More than 5,600 tutors are working across Victorian schools to ensure no student is left behind in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The huge number is 1,500 more than the initial target of 4,100 set for the 2021 school year and includes more than 30 extra tutors in non-government schools – well above the 600 expected. Every school received at least $15,000 to ensure they could participate effectively, with the amount provided to each calculated on the number of enrolments and the number of social disadvantage-funded students in the school. Funding for each school was calculated on an evidence-based model of around 20 per cent of students receiving two or three 45 minute sessions each week, in small groups, for 26 weeks. Schools have employed tutors based on the needs of their students. Some work part-time and offer a range of experience and support levels, and some have deployed existing teaching staff to tutoring roles. Last October the Andrews Labor Government announced a $250 million package and called upon pre-service teachers, teachers on leave, retired teachers and casual relief teachers to sign-up to be tutors – the single biggest boost to individual learning support in Victoria’s history. Tutors are available at every government school and work in small groups, providing extra support for more than 200,000 students across Victoria no matter their circumstances or background. While teachers did a remarkable job last year, having the extra support of onsite tutors in 2021 will ensure these teaching teams can provide dedicated and individualised support for students who need help. Evidence shows students who struggled most with online learning during the pandemic included those with low levels of English, those already at risk of disengaging from school, or those with home environments not conducive to remote learning. To help bring these students up to speed, the $250 million support package includes: $209.6 million for every government school to attract and employ 3,500 tutors across the 2021 school year $30 million to employ 600 tutors at non-government schools to support disadvantaged students. $8.6 million in 2021 for Family Engagement Initiatives to support schools working with families to lift student outcomes and re-engage students with learning. This includes an additional 16 Koorie Engagement Support Officers and 60 additional multilingual and bicultural workers. Schools determine how tutoring support is best implemented in their school. The tutors are providing targeted teaching to students, with a focus on foundational skills of literacy and numeracy. Quotes attributable to Acting Premier and Minister for Education James Merlino “2020 was a year like no other and while we know some students thrived during remote learning, we also know some struggled. This year, we’re using our educators’ skills to help students catch up in the classroom.” “Exceeding our initial target shows the dedication of our educators and means every child in every school across Victoria will be given the support they need to succeed at school and ensure no student is left behind.”

Tutor Target Exceeded Across Victorian Schools

More than 5,600 tutors are working across Victorian schools to ensure no student is left behind in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The huge number is 1,500 more than the initial target of 4,100 set for the 2021 school year and includes more than 30 extra tutors in non-government schools – well above the 600 expected. Every school received at least $15,000 to ensure they could participate effectively, with the amount provided to each calculated on the number of enrolments and the number of social disadvantage-funded students in the school. Funding for each school was calculated on an evidence-based model of around 20 per cent of students receiving two or three 45 minute sessions each week, in small groups, for 26 weeks. Schools have employed tutors based on the needs of their students. Some work part-time and offer a range of experience and support levels, and some have deployed existing teaching staff to tutoring roles. Last October the Andrews Labor Government announced a $250 million package and called upon pre-service teachers, teachers on leave, retired teachers and casual relief teachers to sign-up to be tutors – the single biggest boost to individual learning support in Victoria’s history. Tutors are available at every government school and work in small groups, providing extra support for more than 200,000 students across Victoria no matter their circumstances or background. While teachers did a remarkable job last year, having the extra support of onsite tutors in 2021 will ensure these teaching teams can provide dedicated and individualised support for students who need help. Evidence shows students who struggled most with online learning during the pandemic included those with low levels of English, those already at risk of disengaging from school, or those with home environments not conducive to remote learning. To help bring these students up to speed, the $250 million support package includes: $209.6 million for every government school to attract and employ 3,500 tutors across the 2021 school year $30 million to employ 600 tutors at non-government schools to support disadvantaged students. $8.6 million in 2021 for Family Engagement Initiatives to support schools working with families to lift student outcomes and re-engage students with learning. This includes an additional 16 Koorie Engagement Support Officers and 60 additional multilingual and bicultural workers. Schools determine how tutoring support is best implemented in their school. The tutors are providing targeted teaching to students, with a focus on foundational skills of literacy and numeracy. Quotes attributable to Acting Premier and Minister for Education James Merlino “2020 was a year like no other and while we know some students thrived during remote learning, we also know some struggled. This year, we’re using our educators’ skills to help students catch up in the classroom.” “Exceeding our initial target shows the dedication of our educators and means every child in every school across Victoria will be given the support they need to succeed at school and ensure no student is left behind.”

ACTIVE SCHOOLS GRANTS TO HELP GET KIDS MOVING IN SYDENHAM

A school in Sydenham will receive a funding boost to help get kids moving as they return to school for Term 2, thanks to the Victorian Government. Natalie Hutchins MP today congratulated Copperfield College in Sydenham that is among 96 schools across the state to receive a $30,000 funding boost under the Active Schools initiative to help introduce a whole-school approach to physical activity. Copperfield College will implement new active recreation clubs with local providers and coaches e.g. running/walking, basketball, courtyard games, yoga clubs. The cash boost is part of the $24.2 million Active Schools initiative, which is delivering more opportunities for physical activity, sport and active recreation for Victorian students, helping them develop healthy lifelong habits. As part of the wider Active Schools package: all schools will have access to a new Active Schools Toolkit, which will include tips and tricks on how to make their school and their kids more active a new team of physical education leaders will provide on-the-ground advice and support to more than 800 schools to improve their approach to sport, physical education and physical activity a number of new and innovative approaches to increasing activity will be trialled through several partnerships, including working with the start-up community to explore how technology can get teens moving and adapting Deakin University’s Transform-Us! Program for secondary schools to get adolescents moving more and sitting less a statewide communications campaign designed to encourage children and their families to be more active and promote the importance of physical activity. In November, Minister for Education James Merlino also released a joint ministerial statement with Minister for Community Sport Ros Spence and Minister for Health Martin Foley, which outlines a new strategy to create active schools, kids and communities. The Labor Government is committed to meeting the Education State target of increasing the proportion of students taking part in physical activity five times a week to help them be happier, healthier and more resilient. Quote attributable to Minister for Education James Merlino “The evidence is clear – active kids are happy, healthy and resilient kids, who are able to focus more in class. That’s why we are investing $24.2 million in the creation of Active Schools.” Quote attributable to Natalie Hutchins MP, State Member for Sydenham “Sport and recreation are central to our way of life. These grants will help make sure more young people in Sydenham can get the best start in life with an education linked to active and healthy lifestyles.”

ACTIVE SCHOOLS GRANTS TO HELP GET KIDS MOVING IN SYDENHAM

A school in Sydenham will receive a funding boost to help get kids moving as they return to school for Term 2, thanks to the Victorian Government. Natalie Hutchins MP today congratulated Copperfield College in Sydenham that is among 96 schools across the state to receive a $30,000 funding boost under the Active Schools initiative to help introduce a whole-school approach to physical activity. Copperfield College will implement new active recreation clubs with local providers and coaches e.g. running/walking, basketball, courtyard games, yoga clubs. The cash boost is part of the $24.2 million Active Schools initiative, which is delivering more opportunities for physical activity, sport and active recreation for Victorian students, helping them develop healthy lifelong habits. As part of the wider Active Schools package: all schools will have access to a new Active Schools Toolkit, which will include tips and tricks on how to make their school and their kids more active a new team of physical education leaders will provide on-the-ground advice and support to more than 800 schools to improve their approach to sport, physical education and physical activity a number of new and innovative approaches to increasing activity will be trialled through several partnerships, including working with the start-up community to explore how technology can get teens moving and adapting Deakin University’s Transform-Us! Program for secondary schools to get adolescents moving more and sitting less a statewide communications campaign designed to encourage children and their families to be more active and promote the importance of physical activity. In November, Minister for Education James Merlino also released a joint ministerial statement with Minister for Community Sport Ros Spence and Minister for Health Martin Foley, which outlines a new strategy to create active schools, kids and communities. The Labor Government is committed to meeting the Education State target of increasing the proportion of students taking part in physical activity five times a week to help them be happier, healthier and more resilient. Quote attributable to Minister for Education James Merlino “The evidence is clear – active kids are happy, healthy and resilient kids, who are able to focus more in class. That’s why we are investing $24.2 million in the creation of Active Schools.” Quote attributable to Natalie Hutchins MP, State Member for Sydenham “Sport and recreation are central to our way of life. These grants will help make sure more young people in Sydenham can get the best start in life with an education linked to active and healthy lifestyles.”

Statement On The 30th Anniversary Of The Royal Commission Into Aboriginal Deaths In Custody

Today marks thirty years since the Final Report of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody was tabled in Federal Parliament. It was a seminal moment in our nation’s history. It was supposed to lay out a clear path to reconciliation, and to justice reform. It was supposed to save lives. Instead too many Aboriginal Victorians are still dying in custody.  Too many Aboriginal Victorians are in custody in the first place. For families and communities, the recent death of an Aboriginal person at Ravenhall Correctional Centre is a tragedy and yet another reminder that more work is needed. Reforms to the justice system, such as the abolition of the crime of public drunkenness and the creation of a spent convictions scheme were long overdue, but we are getting on with implementing them. We are pursuing a Treaty to recognise and celebrate the unique status, rights, cultures and histories of Aboriginal Victorians, and finally close the gap in outcomes. Importantly, the Yoo-rrook Justice Commission, afforded the full powers of a Royal Commission, will investigate both historic and contemporary injustices, in a holistic way, so we can continue to make meaningful, systemic and lasting change. We have made these ongoing and necessary reforms in partnership with the Aboriginal community, the Aboriginal Justice Caucus and the First Peoples’ Assembly.  We will continue to work together under the principle of self-determination to reduce the overrepresentation of Aboriginal Victorians in the justice system. The recommendations of the Royal Commission are just as important today as they were 30 years ago – and we will implement them, alongside our partnership with community under Burra Lotjpa Dunguludja - the Aboriginal Justice Agreement Phase 4. We can do better. We will do better.

Statement On The 30th Anniversary Of The Royal Commission Into Aboriginal Deaths In Custody

Today marks thirty years since the Final Report of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody was tabled in Federal Parliament. It was a seminal moment in our nation’s history. It was supposed to lay out a clear path to reconciliation, and to justice reform. It was supposed to save lives. Instead too many Aboriginal Victorians are still dying in custody.  Too many Aboriginal Victorians are in custody in the first place. For families and communities, the recent death of an Aboriginal person at Ravenhall Correctional Centre is a tragedy and yet another reminder that more work is needed. Reforms to the justice system, such as the abolition of the crime of public drunkenness and the creation of a spent convictions scheme were long overdue, but we are getting on with implementing them. We are pursuing a Treaty to recognise and celebrate the unique status, rights, cultures and histories of Aboriginal Victorians, and finally close the gap in outcomes. Importantly, the Yoo-rrook Justice Commission, afforded the full powers of a Royal Commission, will investigate both historic and contemporary injustices, in a holistic way, so we can continue to make meaningful, systemic and lasting change. We have made these ongoing and necessary reforms in partnership with the Aboriginal community, the Aboriginal Justice Caucus and the First Peoples’ Assembly.  We will continue to work together under the principle of self-determination to reduce the overrepresentation of Aboriginal Victorians in the justice system. The recommendations of the Royal Commission are just as important today as they were 30 years ago – and we will implement them, alongside our partnership with community under Burra Lotjpa Dunguludja - the Aboriginal Justice Agreement Phase 4. We can do better. We will do better.

Community Clubs Given A Chance To Change The Game

The Andrews Labor Government is creating more opportunities for women and girls to lead on and off the playing field, through the Change Our Game Community Activation Grants Program. Minister for Community Sport Ros Spence today opened applications for the second round of the Labor Government program, which supports initiatives to further gender equality throughout sport and active recreation. Grants of up to $10,000 are available to eligible clubs and community groups across Victoria and will establish opportunities for women and girls at the grassroots level to enable them to achieve their full potential both on and off the field. The Change Our Game Community Activation Grants program highlights the government’s ongoing commitment to gender equality across all levels of the Victorian sport and active recreation sector. The program has provided 155 grants supporting community sport and recreation organisations to host events ranging from come-and-try days to community forums and educational sessions. These grants are all part of the Government’s $7.2 million investment in the Change Our Game initiative. For more information about the Change Our Game programs visit www.changeourgame.vic.gov.au.

Community Clubs Given A Chance To Change The Game

The Andrews Labor Government is creating more opportunities for women and girls to lead on and off the playing field, through the Change Our Game Community Activation Grants Program. Minister for Community Sport Ros Spence today opened applications for the second round of the Labor Government program, which supports initiatives to further gender equality throughout sport and active recreation. Grants of up to $10,000 are available to eligible clubs and community groups across Victoria and will establish opportunities for women and girls at the grassroots level to enable them to achieve their full potential both on and off the field. The Change Our Game Community Activation Grants program highlights the government’s ongoing commitment to gender equality across all levels of the Victorian sport and active recreation sector. The program has provided 155 grants supporting community sport and recreation organisations to host events ranging from come-and-try days to community forums and educational sessions. These grants are all part of the Government’s $7.2 million investment in the Change Our Game initiative. For more information about the Change Our Game programs visit www.changeourgame.vic.gov.au.

 

Backing Multicultural Young People To Be Leaders

The Andrews Labor Government is backing multicultural young people with more opportunities to develop their skills and come together through sport. Minister for Youth Ros Spence has announced $450,000 for sporting organisations that deliver mentoring and skill building activities for African and Muslim young people. This includes $150,000 each for the Bachar Houli Foundation, Western Bulldogs Community Foundation and The Huddle. The grants were announced at a special event with Bachar Houli and the Richmond Football Club at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on Thursday. The Bachar Houli Foundation will use this funding to continue its Girls Leadership Program, which strengthens identity and community connectedness among Muslim girls aged 12 to 17 years. It will also support the Foundation’s A-Game program, which engages Islamic young people through mentoring opportunities and interactive modules, and the Richmond Football Club’s Tiger Paw program which educates primary school students about teamwork and physical and mental wellbeing. Funding will also support delivery of the Western Bulldogs Community Foundation’s GOAL Youth Mentoring Program, which engages African young people in Melbourne’s West through mentoring and personal development workshops. And it will continue The Huddle’s Wyndham Project, which is based at the North Melbourne Football Club and works with schools in Wyndham to engage African young people in sport and recreation activities and education and career support. Young people from Victoria’s multicultural and faith communities have faced significant challenges during the coronavirus pandemic. With investments like these, the Labor Government is ensuring young people can recover stronger than ever.

Backing Multicultural Young People To Be Leaders

The Andrews Labor Government is backing multicultural young people with more opportunities to develop their skills and come together through sport. Minister for Youth Ros Spence has announced $450,000 for sporting organisations that deliver mentoring and skill building activities for African and Muslim young people. This includes $150,000 each for the Bachar Houli Foundation, Western Bulldogs Community Foundation and The Huddle. The grants were announced at a special event with Bachar Houli and the Richmond Football Club at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on Thursday. The Bachar Houli Foundation will use this funding to continue its Girls Leadership Program, which strengthens identity and community connectedness among Muslim girls aged 12 to 17 years. It will also support the Foundation’s A-Game program, which engages Islamic young people through mentoring opportunities and interactive modules, and the Richmond Football Club’s Tiger Paw program which educates primary school students about teamwork and physical and mental wellbeing. Funding will also support delivery of the Western Bulldogs Community Foundation’s GOAL Youth Mentoring Program, which engages African young people in Melbourne’s West through mentoring and personal development workshops. And it will continue The Huddle’s Wyndham Project, which is based at the North Melbourne Football Club and works with schools in Wyndham to engage African young people in sport and recreation activities and education and career support. Young people from Victoria’s multicultural and faith communities have faced significant challenges during the coronavirus pandemic. With investments like these, the Labor Government is ensuring young people can recover stronger than ever.

Non-Gov Schools Urged To Take Up Respectful Relationships

A new Expression of Interest process will be offered to provide another opportunity for non-government schools to take part in the Andrews Labor Government’s Respectful Relationships program. Respectful Relationships is a whole-school approach, supporting schools to embed respect and gender equality in all aspects of their culture – in the classroom, the playground, the staffroom, and the broader school community. To date, 309 non-government schools have signed up to Respectful Relationships, however, the new EOI opportunity will ensure that the program can be rolled out even further. The Royal Commission into Family Violence recommended the implementation of Respectful Relationships to promote respect, positive attitudes and behaviours, and to teach children how to build healthy relationships, resilience and confidence. It is a program that is proven to work and change the behaviours of young people. The Labor Government has invested $82 million in Respectful Relationships, to deliver training, support and funding to schools to implement the initiative. All Victorian government schools are now part of the Respectful Relationships initiative, acquitting a key recommendation of the Royal Commission into Family Violence. The Minister for Education James Merlino recently announced that, from Term 2 this year, the teaching of consent will be mandatory in all government schools in an age-appropriate way. The Victorian Curriculum requires schools to teach the focus areas of relationships, sexuality and safety. While Respectful Relationships goes directly to the issue of consent, mandating the teaching of consent will bring focus to this critical issue and ensure consistency across the state. Schools and teachers will be supported to deliver the teaching of consent with further guidance and professional development. Non-government schools can apply until 31 May 2021 to take part in Respectful Relationships at the website: http://www.education.vic.gov.au/respectfulrelationships.

Non-Gov Schools Urged To Take Up Respectful Relationships

A new Expression of Interest process will be offered to provide another opportunity for non-government schools to take part in the Andrews Labor Government’s Respectful Relationships program. Respectful Relationships is a whole-school approach, supporting schools to embed respect and gender equality in all aspects of their culture – in the classroom, the playground, the staffroom, and the broader school community. To date, 309 non-government schools have signed up to Respectful Relationships, however, the new EOI opportunity will ensure that the program can be rolled out even further. The Royal Commission into Family Violence recommended the implementation of Respectful Relationships to promote respect, positive attitudes and behaviours, and to teach children how to build healthy relationships, resilience and confidence. It is a program that is proven to work and change the behaviours of young people. The Labor Government has invested $82 million in Respectful Relationships, to deliver training, support and funding to schools to implement the initiative. All Victorian government schools are now part of the Respectful Relationships initiative, acquitting a key recommendation of the Royal Commission into Family Violence. The Minister for Education James Merlino recently announced that, from Term 2 this year, the teaching of consent will be mandatory in all government schools in an age-appropriate way. The Victorian Curriculum requires schools to teach the focus areas of relationships, sexuality and safety. While Respectful Relationships goes directly to the issue of consent, mandating the teaching of consent will bring focus to this critical issue and ensure consistency across the state. Schools and teachers will be supported to deliver the teaching of consent with further guidance and professional development. Non-government schools can apply until 31 May 2021 to take part in Respectful Relationships at the website: http://www.education.vic.gov.au/respectfulrelationships.

Backing More Women To Make The Call

Fifteen women are about to take the first step in progressing their dream of a career in sports broadcasting, thanks to a ground-breaking program from the Andrews Labor Government. Successful applicants will take part in the second round of the Change Our Game Making the Call pilot program, starting at the end of this month.  The first of its kind, the program was created to address the lack of gender diversity in sports broadcasting. It is designed to provide women who are interested in sports broadcasting with the opportunity to further their skills and develop industry connections. The first round of the program was delivered in November 2020 and many of the graduates have moved into a range of industry roles across a variety of sports. Brihony Dawson was a participant in the first round. In a few short months, she succeeded in taking on a number of industry roles, including co-host of the AFLW Grand Final TV show on Channel 31, co-host of All in, an online TV show focused on women’s sport, and will be ground announcer at this week’s AFLW Grand Final in Adelaide. Facilitated by co-creators of the award-winning Outer Sanctum podcast and radio show, Emma and Lucy Race, participants are given tips and advice as well as the opportunity to access broadcasting mentors. Industry experts guiding participants along the way include cricket commentator Mel Jones, TV executive Dave Barham and sports journalists and broadcasters Kelli Underwood, Andy Maher, Daisy Pearce and Megan Hustwaite. This program is part of the Government’s $7.2 million Change Our Game initiative aimed at levelling the playing field for women and girls in sport and recreation. For more information about the Change Our Game Making The Call program visit changeourgame.vic.gov.au.

Backing More Women To Make The Call

Fifteen women are about to take the first step in progressing their dream of a career in sports broadcasting, thanks to a ground-breaking program from the Andrews Labor Government. Successful applicants will take part in the second round of the Change Our Game Making the Call pilot program, starting at the end of this month.  The first of its kind, the program was created to address the lack of gender diversity in sports broadcasting. It is designed to provide women who are interested in sports broadcasting with the opportunity to further their skills and develop industry connections. The first round of the program was delivered in November 2020 and many of the graduates have moved into a range of industry roles across a variety of sports. Brihony Dawson was a participant in the first round. In a few short months, she succeeded in taking on a number of industry roles, including co-host of the AFLW Grand Final TV show on Channel 31, co-host of All in, an online TV show focused on women’s sport, and will be ground announcer at this week’s AFLW Grand Final in Adelaide. Facilitated by co-creators of the award-winning Outer Sanctum podcast and radio show, Emma and Lucy Race, participants are given tips and advice as well as the opportunity to access broadcasting mentors. Industry experts guiding participants along the way include cricket commentator Mel Jones, TV executive Dave Barham and sports journalists and broadcasters Kelli Underwood, Andy Maher, Daisy Pearce and Megan Hustwaite. This program is part of the Government’s $7.2 million Change Our Game initiative aimed at levelling the playing field for women and girls in sport and recreation. For more information about the Change Our Game Making The Call program visit changeourgame.vic.gov.au.

Nutritious And Diverse Food For Victorian Hospitals

Victorian public hospital patients will have access to higher quality, more culturally diverse and locally sourced food, with new standards for our health services to be introduced by the Andrews Labor Government. The new nutrition and quality food standards will be finalised and put in place by the end of this year. Delivering on another key election commitment, the Labor Government had a panel of experts in clinical and food service dietetics, food service management and procurement review the current standards and make recommendations to better serve Victorian patients and residential aged care residents.  The review recommended that any nutrition and quality food standards consider the diverse needs of patients, as well as longer-term aged care residents. We know food provides a sense of wellbeing and emotional comfort for patients and residents, which is particularly important for those in longer-term care.   The new food standards will have a particular focus on taste, appearance and variety of meals. They will also ensure health services respect and celebrate different cultures through their meals – such as kosher or halal food. Nutrition standards will also be developed specifically to meet the special needs of our youngest Victorian patients who have to spend time in hospital. While much of the fresh food purchased through our hospitals is already produced in Victoria, and for regional health services, often locally – the Labor Government will explore ways to support health services to purchase even more foods from Victoria for their patients and residents. This will not only provide the highest quality food to patients but support Victorian producers and local economies wherever possible. Victorian health services will also be required to meet healthy food and drink guidelines for their vending machine and in-house managed cafes, however commercial and retail food outlets located inside our hospitals will not be included. We know most health services are already serving up high quality, safe and nutritious meals but these updates will ensure nutritious, high quality food is consistently delivered in our hospitals and aged care facilities. For more information visit: health.vic.gov.au/hospitals-and-health-services/quality-safety-service/healthy-choices

Nutritious And Diverse Food For Victorian Hospitals

Victorian public hospital patients will have access to higher quality, more culturally diverse and locally sourced food, with new standards for our health services to be introduced by the Andrews Labor Government. The new nutrition and quality food standards will be finalised and put in place by the end of this year. Delivering on another key election commitment, the Labor Government had a panel of experts in clinical and food service dietetics, food service management and procurement review the current standards and make recommendations to better serve Victorian patients and residential aged care residents.  The review recommended that any nutrition and quality food standards consider the diverse needs of patients, as well as longer-term aged care residents. We know food provides a sense of wellbeing and emotional comfort for patients and residents, which is particularly important for those in longer-term care.   The new food standards will have a particular focus on taste, appearance and variety of meals. They will also ensure health services respect and celebrate different cultures through their meals – such as kosher or halal food. Nutrition standards will also be developed specifically to meet the special needs of our youngest Victorian patients who have to spend time in hospital. While much of the fresh food purchased through our hospitals is already produced in Victoria, and for regional health services, often locally – the Labor Government will explore ways to support health services to purchase even more foods from Victoria for their patients and residents. This will not only provide the highest quality food to patients but support Victorian producers and local economies wherever possible. Victorian health services will also be required to meet healthy food and drink guidelines for their vending machine and in-house managed cafes, however commercial and retail food outlets located inside our hospitals will not be included. We know most health services are already serving up high quality, safe and nutritious meals but these updates will ensure nutritious, high quality food is consistently delivered in our hospitals and aged care facilities. For more information visit: health.vic.gov.au/hospitals-and-health-services/quality-safety-service/healthy-choices